Things to do in Aruba

Aruba, a small Caribbean island 29 km north of Venezuela, is a part of the ABC islands – Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao, which forms the Dutch Caribbean and is a part of the Netherlands. It is famous for its white-sand beaches.

Where to stay

Aruba Downtown is far from the impressive beaches in the northwest. Choose a hotel/resort/Airbnb near the world-famous Eagle Beach or Palm beach. Public transport consists of a bus which takes 5.2 US$ on a single-ride and runs almost once an hour. Taxis, just like everything else, on the island, are expensive.

Aruba

Aruba

Things to do

  1. Island tour – on a Jeep or a UTV. We did the Jeep Safari tour, whose highlights were an animal garden, Arikok national park, and the natural pool.
    Wariruri Beach

    Wariruri Beach

    Baby bridges

    Baby bridges

    Natural Pool

    Natural Pool

    Lighthouse

    Lighthouse

  2. Animal Garden – we did this as a part of Safari, but if you are not doing that, it is worth checking out the animal farm on its own.
    Animal Farm 1

    Animal Farm 1

    Animal Farm 2

    Animal Farm 2

    Animal Farm 3

    Animal Farm 3

  3. Scuba Diving – Mangel Halto beach is famous for Scuba diving. It has both a rich flora & fauna as well as a shipwreck.Scuba
    Ship wreck (13 m below surface)

    Shipwreck (13 m below surface)

    Scuba

  4. De Palm Island – I didn’t do this experience since I was going for Scuba. But if you aren’t, then this could be an excellent half-day trip.
  5. Butterfly Garden – I skipped it since I was going to the animal farm. But if you aren’t, then this might be an excellent short trip for a few hours.

Notes

  1. Given its location, the island is hot year-round. The island is semi-arid due to the low rainfall.
  2. Sunlight is strong in Aruba, so do carry a hat, sunscreen, and skin creams to keep yourself safe. Everything is imported and is expensive.
  3. Aruba is more famous among American tourists, while Europeans usually go for Curacao.
  4. Tap water is potable (drinkable) everywhere, thanks to the massive investments in desalination plants.
  5. English is widely spoken. English + Spanish would give you 100% coverage, though.

 

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